Dear MendMeShop,

The Shoulder Inferno wrap is working well for my shoulder bursitis. I went to my primary care doctor this week, and she was very interested in the treatments and the success - when little else was working in the last 5 months. My shoulder pain has gone away completely, and so I am obviously very pleased with the results.

Rating: Five Star Rating

Karen Schmieder

 

Dear MendMeShop,

As a professional athlete, my body takes a lot of abuse during training. Boxing is very strenuous on the arms and shoulders and I have had a rotator cuff injury for the past two years. The shoulders don't get a lot of blood flow, so injuries don't heal properly on their own. The injury had gotten so bad, I thought I might have to retire from the ring. Then I started using the Inferno Wrap and the Freezie Wrap every day. I use the Inferno Wrap before my workouts to relax and loosen up the muscles in my shoulder and increase the circulation. After a hard training session (sometimes up to 3 hours), I use the Freezie Wrap to deal with any remaining inflammation. My shoulder has felt better in the past two months than it has in the past two years! I highly recommend both of these products to anyone with a chronic injury who is saddled with daily pain. -Molly McConnell Top World ranked professional female boxer

Rating: Five Star Rating

Molly McConnell

 

Dear MendMeShop,

My back is feeling better. Regular heating pads don't seem to work as well as the Inferno - I would assume due to their lack of penetration. The Inferno Wrap is of good benefit at this point. Thanks for a great product.

Rating: Five Star Rating

Bradford Hicks

 

Dear MendMeShop,

So far, so good! I've used the shoulder treatment 4x a day for a week now and seen a marked improvement in my shoulder with both flex ability and pain relief. P.S. As a follow up one week after the initial comments... Indeed, after a couple weeks of use, the pain totally subsided. Thanks!!!

Rating: Five Star Rating

Roger Hall

 

Meniscus Tear Surgery

Do I need meniscus surgery?

Your activity level, age, the type and location of the tear, the severity, your symptoms, and any other associated knee injuries will be considered to determine whether conservative or surgical treatment options are more appropriate. Once your medical professional has diagnosed your meniscus tear, he/she can better recommend the most effective treatment for your knee pain.

Meniscal tears are graded on 3 levels; 1 being the least severe and 3 being the most. Grade 1 and 2 tears may not even be apparent during an arthroscopic exam and can usually be repaired without surgery. Grade 3 tears generally require surgery.

Success Stories

Conservative treatments, such as Blood Flow Stimulation Therapy, are generally recommended for partial, stable and degenerative meniscus tears. Surgical options are used more often for larger, complex or displaced tears.

At one time, surgeons removed injured menisci believing they served no purpose, however doctors now know the importance of the meniscus to the knee joint mechanics and function. Removing part of the meniscus should be avoided if possible, especially if it will weaken the periphery since it will compromise the load absorption capabilities and can increase the risk of degeneration. However, if the meniscus is at risk of further damage or the knee cannot flex or extend properly, surgery many be required to minimize damage (i.e. remove the flap to prevent more tearing) and restore joint function. It is beneficial to try to heal a meniscus tear prior to surgery to avoid it if possible or to minimize the amount of meniscus that needs to be repaired or trimmed.

Do I need meniscus surgery?

If an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury occurs when the medial meniscus is torn, surgery may be required to repair the ACL.

If conservative treatments are unable to treat your tear completely, your physician may recommend a surgical option. A comprehensive arthroscopic exam is usually performed prior to surgery to determine the location and nature of the tear and whether or not it can be repaired.

You are generally a candidate for surgery if you have injured your meniscus and you:

  • Experience symptoms that interfere with your daily living after 2 - 3 months (knee catching or locking, very stiff and painful, major instability).
  • Have a larger, complex or displaced tear.
  • Have major instability in your knee (often due to a combined meniscus/ACL injury)
  • Are a high-level athlete

Types of Meniscus Surgery

Arthroscopic meniscus surgery trims meniscus tears

Treating a torn meniscus is one of the most common of all knee surgeries. The type of surgery you require will depend on the size, shape and location of your meniscus injury. There are generally 3 types of meniscus surgery: a meniscectomy, a meniscal repair, or a meniscal replacement. All of these will be performed arthroscopically while under some type of anesthesia; they usually don't require an overnight hospital stay. Your orthopedic surgeon will determine which surgery is most suited to your condition.

Arthroscopic surgery involves making tiny incisions around your knee joint and inserting a pencil-thin, fiber optic camera with a small lens and lighting system in one hole, and small surgical instruments in the other holes. The surgeon will take a look inside your joint to investigate all the soft tissues and bones. These images will then be transmitted to a TV monitor, which allow the doctor to make a diagnosis and/or perform the meniscus surgery under video control.

Success Stories

Most surgeries will require rehabilitation utilizing conservative treatments such as cold compression therapy and Blood Flow Stimulation Therapy. Cold compression should be used immediately following surgery to reduce pain and swelling. Blood Flow Stimulation Therapy can begin once your incisions have healed, with permission from your doctor. Physical therapy and strengthening normally begin a few weeks after surgery (depending on the type of surgery). Your surgeon should provide a treatment plan to help you regain normal use as soon as possible.

Meniscal Repair

A meniscal repair is generally preferred over a meniscectomy, as it fixes the damage and helps prevent deterioration of your meniscus. However, this involves a more complex surgery, the recovery is longer and it is not always possible (depending on the location). Early diagnosis definitely can affect the outcome of this surgery. Younger people tend to be the best candidates as their tears are often stable and located near the periphery of the meniscus. These tears have a better chance of healing than those farther in the joint because of the blood supply. After surgery and with permission from your surgeon and Blood Flow Stimulation Therapy can help promote blood circulation to the injured areas to help you heal faster.

Trepanation (Abrasion Technique) involves making small holes or shaving torn edges in your meniscus to promote bleeding and enhance healing. Longitudinal tears or bucket handle tears often won't heal unless they are abraded.

A peripheral meniscus tear may be sutured to assist with repair

Suturing involves using stitches to reconnect the tear, repair the damage, and save your meniscus. The sutures are spaced 3-4 mm apart to prevent gapping and sewn while your knee is fully extended (or at 10 degrees maximum) to allow for full extension after surgery.

Meniscectomy

The most common meniscus surgery is a Partial Meniscectomy or Resection, which involves removal of the torn or damaged part of your meniscus. It is generally used for degenerative and horizontal tears located in the inner 2/3 of your meniscus (the white-on-white zone). This area has a poor healing rate because it receives little or no blood supply, therefore it is better to remove the damaged part rather than try to fix it. The goal of this surgery is stabilization, which will prevent catching, buckling and locking in your knee joint. The surgeon will trim and smooth out frayed edges on the inner rim (which can be difficult to reach), and remove the damaged part or flap of your meniscus.

In the case of a discoid meniscus that did not heal through conservative treatments, part of your meniscus may be removed to relieve symptoms, prevent further tearing and preserve some of your meniscus cushioning function.

A Complete Meniscectomy or Resection may be required if there is extensive damage to the meniscus and it is determined unsalvageable. This involves surgical removal of your entire meniscus. If you have your meniscus removed, the rest of your joint gets overloaded (resulting in a 200%-350% increase in contact pressure). This surgery is only performed if necessary, as removal of the meniscus can lead to joint narrowing, ridging, flattening, and becoming bow-legged or knock-kneed. Complete meniscectomy patients often express dissatisfaction with the corrected knee as time goes on.

Although meniscectomies have faster recovery than other meniscus surgeries they can often lead to arthritis as the size of your meniscus (shock absorber) is reduced and/or removed. Normal knees have 20% better shock-absorbing capacity than meniscectomized knees.

Meniscal Replacement

A Meniscal Replacement involves implanting a new meniscus into your knee. There are two different replacements that can be used:

A meniscus may be replaced with an allograft or collegen implant

An allograft is a transplant from a donor. A good candidate for this type of replacement is someone who is young, has minimal ACL damage, is a previous menisectomy patient, and has developed pain in the knee capsule. If the patient is obese, suffers from gout or arthritis, has an infection or any metabolic disease (being unable to convert food to energy) they are not likely candidates for this procedure. The success of this surgery is dependent on proper knee alignment, ligament stability, and amount of articular cartilage that is present.

A collagen implant is also an option to replace the meniscus. The implant is stitched into place with the hope that your body's own cells will begin to regenerate new meniscal tissue by attaching itself to the porous surface of the implant. In this way, the implant works as a scaffold to assist the body with its own repair process.

Rehabilitation Following Surgery

Initially following a meniscal repair, the knee is immobilized in full extension with a postoperative immobilizer which is eventually replaced with a long leg brace. This brace is worn continuously (expect during rehabilitation exercises) for at least 2 weeks, with the range allowance of the brace increasing as the weeks progress. This continues until the knee can be fully flexed. Note, in some cases such as a central zone repair or a mensical transplant the brace may be necessary for 6 weeks or longer. Following a partial meniscectomy, immobilization is not required and full extension with 90 degree flexion is possible approximately 10 days after surgery.

With a meniscus repair you may be allowed to bear some weight on your repaired knee with the assistance of crutches and a brace immediately following surgery. The amount of weight and progression of weight allowed will depend on your specific case. However, you will be able to bear full weight within 4-8 weeks if your quadriceps control is good. In the case of a partial meniscectomy, you should be able to bear full weight within 4-7 days.

The goal of professionally led exercises during the first month of rehabilitation is to regain range of motion in the joint, regain muscle control in the leg, ensure the patella does not lose mobility, maintain flexibility and strength in the hip and ankle, and restore stability. You doctor, surgeon or physical therapist will assist you with these exercises to achieve these goals without causing re-injury.

Following a meniscal repair, you should avoid pivoting, squatting, twisting and deep lunging exercises for at least 4-6 months following surgery. Jogging or running should be avoided for 5-6 months of rehabilitation. Generally you will be able to return to normal activities and sports approximately 6 weeks after a partial meniscectomy and 3-4 months after a meniscal repair or replacement. However, it is always recommended that you get your surgeon's approval before beginning any exercises or activities following meniscus surgery.

Research indicates pain relief after a partial meniscectomy or abrasion is about 50 - 75%. Healing and recovery time is generally dependent on the degree of damage done, your age, pre-injury level of function, and your rehabilitation. Tenderness, pain, stiffness and weakness are very common after surgery. That is why a strong commitment to rehabilitation utilizing the conservative treatments such as Blood Flow Stimulation Therapy and ColdCure Technology® is essential!

How to Order

To find out more about these therapies, visit the meniscus treatment page. Cold compression therapy and Blood Flow Stimulation Therapy may be used prior to surgery to fix the repairable tissue damage or after surgery to improve and speed healing. The therapeutic devides that provide these therapies are valuable tools for anyone with meniscus injuries and knee pain.

A Word of Caution

There are always some risks associated with any surgery, which include but are not limited to possible infection, allergic reaction to medications, blood clots, and damage to surrounding nerves (peroneal nerve with a lateral repair, saphenous nerve with a medial repair) or blood vessels. However, modern techniques have significantly minimized the occurrence of these problems.

If you feel any clicking in your knee during exercise or weight bearing activities following surgery, let your surgeon know immediately.

Although surgery is often successful at repairing any damage and/or relieving pain, it does not necessarily return strength to your knee.

There are occasions where surgery is not necessary, or not worth the potential for further damage. As with all surgical procedures, it is usually recommended that you get a second opinion before making a decision.

Please be aware that this information is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. CALL YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER IMMEDIATELY IF YOU THINK YOU MAY HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider before starting any new treatment or with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.


Dear MendMeShop,

I have to admit, I fully expected to be returning my order. (inferno wrap, freezie wrap) I told my wife "this is a lot of money and if doesn't work I'm sending it back", "I've got 60 days". Well after about 9 days of (2) treatments per day my severe case of Lateral Epicondylitis (tennis elbow) is almost pain free. I tried wearing the over the counter tendon support brace with absolutely no results. My elbow pain was so bad I couldn't sleep at night and just knew I was going to have to see a doctor. Then I found your website. I was very impressed with the quality of your wraps, very thick and made form high quality materials. I guess the old adage "you get what you pay for" speaks volumes here. I'm completely sold on your products and won't be returning anything!!! Thank you for helping heal my tennis elbow and I've already told many of my friends about your web site. 100% satisfied Cameron Caldwell from Meriden, KS.

Rating: Five Star Rating

Cameron Caldwell

 

Dear MendMeShop,

I fell down on ice last March, hit my left shoulder on the ground pretty hard and stirred up an old injury that hadn't bothered me for twenty years. I was in a great deal of pain and tried everything I could think of that might help. I only found temporary relief from the pain. It wasn't until I began using your Shoulder Inferno Wrap that I truly began to heal and the pain slowly began to subside. After several months, I still use the Wrap daily to maintain the healing and progress I've made. I then also sought the advice of a physical therapist because in addition to the pain I used to have before using the Wrap, I was still dealing with stiffness and a very limited range of motion. After examining me, the therapist said I didn't have rotator cuff issues just muscle issues, a thing called "frozen shoulder". For seven weeks now I have received help from a massage therapist and am slowly improving the range of motion. I chose to work with her because her sessions include massage and stretching. A session leaves my shoulder feeling slightly sore. I use the Inferno Wrap afterwards and the heat I feel as it works relieves the soreness. I am sure using the Wrap also helps the muscles "remember" longer the right way they are supposed to feel and function. Combining the Wrap with massage therapy has been a winning combo for me! Do I dare confess...I love the Wrap so much that I will definitely buy another one. The Back Wrap will be my next purchase from you. I mean this whole-heartedly - thank you for the Wrap! I am also pleased with your customer service. Dealing with you was a pleasure. You really do care about your customers! I am delighted and impressed with your product and your people. __________________

Rating: Five Star Rating

Deborah Barnsdale

 

Inferno Wrap Knee for meniscus injury acl injury mcl injury or hyperextended knee

Cold Compression Knee Freezie Wrap for meniscus injury mcl injury and acl injury

This universal leg wrap can increase healing rate of a shin, calf, groin, thigh, or hamstring

Freezie Leg wrap for cold compression of the shin, calf, groin, thigh, or hamstring

Treasure trove on information about the meniscus written for laymen.

Top 5 Range of Motion Exercises for Meniscus.

Contact one of our Mendmeshop Customer Service Advisors for any questions help with ordering and recommended treatment directions