Dear MendMeShop,

Just a note to let you know I'm 100% satisfied with all of the products I've ordered from your company including the Hamstring INFERNO wrap.

Rating: Five Star Rating

Mary Ann Michalsky

 

Frozen Shoulder Anatomy

Women are more likely to have frozen shoulder with age.

Your shoulder joint involves bones, muscles, tendons, ligaments, connective tissues and synovial fluid. There are 3 main bones in your shoulder: the shoulder blade (scapula), the collarbone (clavicle) and the upper arm bone (humerus). These are attached to each other by ligaments (attach bone to bone). Muscles move your bones by pulling on your tendons (attach muscle to bone). Both tendons and ligaments provide stability and alignment to your joint to ensure easy movement in your shoulder. The main muscles involved with your shoulder joint are your rotator cuff muscles (supraspinatus, subscapularis, infraspinatus and teres minor), as well as your biceps brachii (upper arm), deltoid (top of the shoulder), and trapezius (upper back) muscles.

Shoulder joint anatomy

The shoulder is one of the most mobile and flexible joints in your body. It is a "ball and socket" joint (glenohumeral joint), in which the ball (the top, rounded part of your humerus) is held in the socket (the shallow, depressed area called your glenoid cavity, located on the outer edge of your scapula). There is a ring of fibrous cartilage (labrum) that surrounds the glenoid cavity and articular cartilage (slick, hard connective tissue) that covers the end of the humerus to help stabilize the ball in the socket and reduce friction. Your entire joint is surrounded by a tough, fibrous, flexible shoulder joint capsule and inner synovial membrane that produces synovial fluid (thick, egg-white like fluid). This helps to lubricate your shoulder joint and allows the bones to move easily within your joint. When your arm is raised over your head the joint capsule is fully stretched, when your arm is lowered to your side, the capsule rests in a small, pouch-like sac. Your bursa is a fluid-filled sac that lies beneath your acromion (bump on top, outer edge of your clavicle) and above your soft tissues to prevent rubbing when your bones are moved.

What is Frozen Shoulder?

Frozen shoulder occurs when scar tissue builds up in the shoulder joint locking the shoulder in postion

Your shoulder has an amazing range of motion which is a blessing and a curse, as it can sometimes lack stability which makes it more prone to injury. The conditions adhesive capsulitis and frozen shoulder are often used interchangeably; however there is a slight difference between the two conditions.

Literally the word adhesive means "scarring", and capsulitis means "inflammation of the capsule". Adhesive capsulitis happens when the shoulder joint capsule and soft tissues surrounding your socket (glenoid cavity) become inflamed, swollen and contracted. This causes bands of scar tissue (adhesions) to develop in your joint; as a result your tissues become less flexible, stick together and restrict movement. You will experience pain, stiffness, a limited range and gradual loss of overall motion in your shoulder joint, because of the adherence of your shoulder capsule to the top of your humerus. Eventually your joint may become stuck to the point where you have no movement at all.

Frozen shoulder is the generalized name for gradual loss of ability to move your shoulder in all directions. A number of pre-existing conditions can cause and/or encourage adhesive capsulitis to occur in your shoulder joint. This condition is influenced by injuries to your shoulder muscles, tendons, ligaments and the associated bursa, as well as other diseases. Often before you can deal with or determine the other conditions, you must first get rid of the adhesive capsulitis and regain movement in your shoulder.

Frozen shoulder affects 2 - 5% of the population (about 1 in 50 adults will get this at some time in their life). Generally you will experience frozen shoulder in either your left or right shoulder, whichever is your non-dominant shoulder (if you are right handed it would be in your left shoulder and vice versa). About 15% of the population (1 in 5 cases) will get it on both sides at some time in their life, however rarely ever at the same time. It is very uncommon to suffer from frozen shoulder in the same shoulder twice and normally it does not affect other joints in your body. Frozen shoulder is not known to lead to major damage and/or other more serious conditions; more so, it is generally a side effect of other conditions and/or a condition in and of itself.

Success Stories

Since adhesive capsulitis and frozen shoulder are very similar and difficult to differentiate, they are treated in the same way. For our purpose, we will look at these injuries as one condition.

Alternate Names and Related Conditions:

Adhesive capsulitis, pitcher's arm, rotator cuff tears, calcific bursitis, arthritis, tendinitis, supraspinatus tendinitis, brachial neuritis, reflex sympathetic dystrophy, pericapsulitis, periarthritis, adherent bursitis, obliterative bursitis, dupuytren contracture.


Dear MendMeShop,

I am a 44 year-old woman in good health. I eat a fresh diet and take high-quality supplements, including MSM, glucosamine, Zyflamend, and all the usual joint-recomended supplements. I injured both knees two years ago while kneeling to tile my family room and entry. Subsequently, a simple twisting squat ripped my left meniscus with a huge bucket tear that required surgery to trim so it wouldn't keep catching and re-tearing. I am not one to undergo surgery unless it is unavoidable, and even after a "simple" scope operation, it took me a full year to get full extension back on that knee, and I doubt I will ever be able to squat again. I run a cleaning business. A couple of months ago an employee had forgotten to return equipment to my van, and I had to mop some hardwood flooring for a client on my hands and knees. That simple ten-minute job put me back out of commission. The kneeling pre-injured the area, and when I stepped back onto my good leg two days later, I felt that familiar burn of a fresh meniscus tear. I was heartsick, dreading another surgery and the attendant expense, pain, and down time. I know from my previous experience that cartilage is hard to heal because of the poor blood supply, especially to the center. I knew it was just a matter of time before I tore it further. (My dad had multiple knee scopes before finally getting a replacement, but I was not going down that path if I could help it!) I got online and researched alternatives that would get me back on my feet. Delighted to discover Mend Me Shop and their professional athletic healing devices, I ordered the Inferno Wrap and Ice Wrap. $400 would be a pittance relative to the $13,000 it costs to repair a torn meniscus (and that doesn't include rehab and lost income). During the week it took the package to arrive, I stayed off my feet as much as possible and iced the injured knee several times a day. My big hope was simply to avoid tearing the cartilage further before the stuff came. (With my surgery knee, I had re-torn it repeatedly before surgery.) The minute that I put that Inferno wrap around my bad knee, I was in love! The penetrating warmth felt amazing. I kept it by my desk and strapped it on when I would sit and work at the computer. And I kept icing the knee. Within a couple weeks I was walking evenly on both legs, if gingerly lest I inadvertently twist or bounce. But I was definitely healing. I didn't miss any work after the first week, though I moved more slowly than usual and occasionally felt that piercing reminder of the tear. I had to lie down and elevate my knee every two hours to get through the day, but it was slowly healing. Four weeks later I was feeling so good, and the day was so sunny, that I went skipping off the front porch and was reminded I have a torn meniscus! And so it goes to this day, some six weeks later: the injury is there, but it is gradually improving. The more I use the therapy devices, the faster it improves. The more I get lazy and feel perfect and neglect them, the more I slow down. But I work a full schedule without breaks and only occasionally am reminded of the injury. By God's grace and with many thanks to Mend Me Shop, I have avoided surgery! Gratefully yours, Debbie Morgan

Rating: Five Star Rating

Debbie Morgan

 

Inferno Wrap Shoulder - an advanced treatment for shoulder injury and rotator cuff injury

Freezie Wrap Shoulder - efficient relief of swelling and pain from an active sprain, shoulder strain, whiplash, or tight upper back muscles

Top 5 Frozen Shoulder Exercises for Frozen Shoulder and Shoulder Impingement

Blood Flow Stimulation Therapy with an Inferno Back wrap for the ultimate in sore back healing

Freeze Wrap Back - reduce back pain and swelling in sore, strained or overused muscles, especially in the lower back and trapezius muscles

Ceanix Professional Back Therapy Vest - efficient relief of swelling and pain from rotator, upper back or mid back injury

Contact one of our Mendmeshop Customer Service Advisors for any questions help with ordering and recommended treatment directions